Child Nutrition Beyond the 1,000-Day Window of Opportunity

This Universal Children’s Day, we encourage the global development community to think strategically, creatively, and inclusively in addressing nutrition before and after the 1,000-day window.

Tracking Nutrition Funding Isn’t Easy, but the Payoff Could be Better Outcomes

Malnutrition is one of the greatest challenges to health and development in many low- and middle-income countries—it contributes to 45 percent of all deaths in children under the age of five. Like any national challenge, sufficient, sustained funding is needed to address this issue.

Climate-Smart Agriculture is Nutrition Smart: Five Links between Climate Change and Nutrition

If we look at why we need food—that is, for our bodies to receive the nutrients they need to perform at their best—then food security is really about nutrition security. When we look at how climate change affects whether “all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food” we must keep nutrition at the forefront of the conversation.

Nourishing Children Where Food is not Enough

Meeting the nutritional needs of young children is a particularly important aspect of global health, as insufficient nutrition during periods of rapid growth, which overlap with the weaning period, can have serious negative effects on health and other life-long outcomes. The long-term solution for solving micronutrient inadequacy is ensuring a sustainable and diverse diet through food-based approaches.

Looking Back on Our First 1,000 Days

Facing my own challenges with breastfeeding, pumping, and complementary feeding despite a supportive work environment, help from my family, and relatively easy access to healthy food has given me even more respect for the mothers and communities SPRING works with who overcome even greater barriers to making breastfeeding and healthy eating a reality in their lives.

Nutrition Myth Busting on April Fools’ Day

Don’t be fooled by misinformation! Abhi Goyal and Christa Reynolds of the SPRING project separate nutrition fact from fiction for April Fools’ day.