Using Our Competencies and Compassion to Defeat HIV

Elena Thomas Faulkner, JSI, shares how this year’s USCA challenges us to move forward in the fight against HIV “with new hope and energy” and why we must remember that we can’t eliminate HIV without continuing to address the stigma and challenges that have nothing to do with the exciting emerging science of HIV treatment. The focus on the most vulnerable, and the competencies, compassion, and advocacy that have brought us this far in the fight are just as important as we move toward a future in which HIV is defeated.

Integration in Rome: NUMAT’s take on the 6th International AIDS Conference

Andrew Alyao Ocero is the Director of Clinical Services on JSI’s Northern Uganda Malaria AIDS and Tuberculosis (NUMAT) Program. In this blog, Dr. Ocero calls Rome a theatrical backdrop to the IAS 2011 conference’s grand three day performance, where findings of landmark clinical trials were put on show, studies were debated, and challenges and innovations were hashed out. He and fellow participating NUMAT staff noted the clear message that implementation science needs to become part and parcel of strategies aimed at strengthening health service delivery, took away a greater appreciation of the ways stronger referral mechanisms and more comprehensive MCH and FP services can attract more HIV clients to use services, and were given pause by two papers presented at the conference which put a caveat on assumptions about service integration as a panacea for improved HIV care.

The Nexus of HIV Prevention and Care

Arguing, bantering, and…throwing paper balls at each other?! Read more from Juli Powers about one HIV care strategy session at the 2011 National HIV Prevention Conference, and why things are different this year.

HIV Prevention: A New Beginning?

Stewart Landers writes from the 2011 National HIV Prevention Conference, “It feels a bit ironic to be blogging for the first time from the National HIV Prevention Conference on the same day that the Boston Globe publicized the drastic budget cuts that the Massachusetts HIV/AIDS Office has made to its very successful HIV prevention programs. At the same time, the notion of “a new beginning” for HIV prevention, despite the new austerity, has been very much at the heart of the opening day of this meeting.”