Peer learning and leadership strengthening help global south achieve health goals

Despite the demonstrated benefits of peer learning in the global south, rarely had the approach been applied in Africa. In October 2018, JSI led an initiative to foster technical leadership through inter-country peer-to-peer exchange in sub-Saharan Africa.

You can’t treat what you don’t see: Valuing child health data collection in Mozambique

A lack of routine data to assess child health interventions has remained a stubborn obstacle to better care in Mozambique. MCSP’s introduction of a new child health registration book is changing that by ensuring the availability of quality child health data to support decision making.

Burmese Midwife Leads “Small but Mighty” Health Team Linking Rural Villages to Lifesaving Care

JSI-trained integrated community malaria volunteers (IMCVs) are at the frontlines of patient identification and treatment follow-up for tuberculosis (TB). These IMCVs are able to reach populations that would otherwise not have access to life-saving health services due to limited human resources.

Disease Surveillance is Key to Freeing Madagascar from Polio

With USAID funding, MCSP mobilized to address this gap and the outbreak of vaccine-derived polio virus in Madagascar. MCSP’s Child Health and Immunization programming is led by JSI.

It Takes A Village – Caring for Older Adults who Suffer from Asthma

JSI intern Rachael Meyer describes her experiences engaging in the Reducing Older Adult Asthma Disparities study, made poignant due to her own family’s experience supporting her grandfather.

Key Takeaways for Maternal Health from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2018 Annual Meeting

JSI’s Merce Gasco and Natasha Vartapetova reflect on health disparities, family planning, maternal health, and other key takeaways from the ACOG annual meeting.

Respectful Care: A new term for the family-centered approach that women have been requesting

One of the strategies to reduce maternal mortality worldwide is to encourage the use of health facilities during birth by paying attention to the way women are treated in those facilities – with an emphasis on care with support and dignity. It’s called “respectful care,” and although it’s a new buzzword in the maternal health community, the idea is anything but new. Women have been asking for this for decades, even if not in those very words.