#AIDS2010 presentations take closer look at ART Guidelines

What is the lesson learned from this new evidence? Probably, our programs will see more and more frequently the use of CD4 count tests, depending on various national policies and the different degree of compliance with the WHO guidelines. We need to be ready to incorporate this element into our activities that are related to HIV care and treatment. Additionally, we may look into possible alternative options to implement the provision of CD4 tests.

TB & HIV Together Must be Evaluated Alone

There is still something missing in the monitoring of TB/HIV activities that would be worth collecting. TB and both ART and pre-ART patients are currently being assessed in cohorts and their outcome measured according to standardized categories. However, little is known about the outcome of co-infected individuals, since their details get mixed with the overall cohort they belong to.

Dr. Anthony Fauci’s Speech & Pathogenesis

This poses a serious question for all of us working in HIV/AIDS-related projects across African countries. It is rare to find a clear policy on professional PEP, and even when policy is in place, its implementation is patchy to say the least. Health workers in program-supported facilities get exposed to possible infection, but data are scanty (no directory of professional incidents is being compiled); ARVs may not be easily available for any use other than treating registered patients; and a sense of resignation about the occurrence of these incidents is common among health staff. While the PEP strategy is being gradually expanded for post-rape survivors, it is paramount to provide it for health workers even in remote facilities with no ARV provision.

Do HIV Interventions have a Positive Impact on Other Health Programs?

our programs should nonetheless endeavor to gather as much data on other aspects of care as possible and to find time for elaborating and analyzing more health information. This could produce two essential results. First, by doing so we should be able to look at the broader picture of our intervention as far as health care services are concerned. Secondly, we could be more informed and authoritative in documenting our findings, supporting our views, and contributing to the design of future programs.