​Environmental Health Literacy – Key to Unlocking a Safer Future (Part 2)

Advancing environmental health literacy is not a top-down process from expert to resident. As a public health practitioner, the most valuable lessons I nurture have come from the expertise and leadership of those who are disproportionately affected by societal inequities.

Insights from the United States Conference on AIDS

Several sessions this year focused on what works in HIV prevention for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth of color. One approach to engaging these disproportionately affected youth is to use community mobilization, or outreach to, and collaboration with, different community stakeholders.

Youth to Durban: “Listen!”

Last week in Durban, at the International Conference on AIDS, young people stole the show. This was the second Durban conference; the first was 16 years ago, in 2000. Back then, a major conference topic was commitment: mobilizing leaders around the world to commit seriously to addressing the spread of HIV in their countries. Looking back on our progress since 2000, the HIV and AIDS community can say with pride that we have come a long way. Seventeen million people have access to treatment. We have eliminated mother-to-child transmission in Cuba, Belarus, Armenia, Moldova and Thailand.

Senegalese Basketball Star Takes a Time-out to Talk with Local Youth

Senegalese basketball sensation Marie Rosche visited students at the Live, Learn & Play (LLP) program on Wednesday, June 29th. Marie chatted with eager youth at Talibou Dabo, a public school that accepts and accommodates disabled children in Dakar, Senegal. The LLP youth were elated to meet a basketball star and hung on her words as Marie told them how basketball shaped her life. She talked about basketball’s influence upon her education and career path, but also in shaping her as a person.

FP2020: Celebrating Our Progress by Fulfilling Our Promise

Since 2012, 24.4 million more women and girls are accessing modern contraception, bringing the total to 290.6 million users in the 69 FP2020 focus countries. Yet as we take time to celebrate these gains for women and girls, we know that there are still places in the world where a woman’s choice to use those contraceptives is not a given. As of 2015, 10 million fewer women and girls have been reached with lifesaving contraception than we had hoped by this time. Continuing at this pace means that millions of women and girls will not receive the family planning services and supplies they need to support their fundamental right to make decisions about their reproductive health. JSI’s Leslie Patykewich looks at the gains that have been made in ensuring women and girls have access to contraceptive information, services and supplies, and ways to address the barriers that are still faced.

International Youth Day 2014: Going beyond disease and mortality

August 12 is International Youth Day. MCHIP’s Maura Gaughan provides insight into the global strategies to improve child health.

Supporting communities to improve young people’s sexual and reproductive health

The Advancing Partners and Communities (APC) project supports youth-serving organizations and youth programming through capacity building and small grants.

HIV/AIDS awareness in the Atlanta University Center: alive and well

Recently, my alma mater took part in National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), held on February 7, 2012. Morehouse College, the only all-male, historically black institution of higher learning in the world, has a history of student activism and involvement. Nestled within the Atlanta University Center (AUC), Morehouse collaborated with the historically black institutions of … Continue reading “HIV/AIDS awareness in the Atlanta University Center: alive and well”

Youth, Mobile, and Health at Sex::Tech 2011

Mobile health is a hot topic. Youth want to access health information quickly and easily, especially when it comes to HIV. This could be anything from learning what HIV is, to answering a question about how it’s transmitted, to finding an HIV testing site nearby. And youth can (and do!) do this with cell phones. Mindy Nichamin at JSI writes about AIDS.gov’s participation in two recent conferences: Sex::Tech and Mobile Health 2011.