You Can’t Manage What You Can’t See: Making Cold Chain Data Visible in Tanzania

Recently, JSI, in partnership with Nexleaf Analytics, installed ColdTrace 5, a remote temperature monitoring (RTM) device, in 120 vaccine storage sites across Tanzania. RTM solutions monitor the temperature of vaccine cold chain equipment in real time, send SMS alerts to health workers when temperature excursions occur, and provide valuable data and analytics to improve the overall cold chain. Seeing the performance of the fridge in real time allows for better management of the cold chain equipment and vaccines.

Voices Of Public Health – What’s Next in Immunization?: Robert Steinglass

In this episode, you will hear from JSI Immunization Expert, Robert Steinglass. He talks to JSI Program Manager, Adriana Alminana about the importance of vaccination for improved public health and the growing need to increase focus on strengthening routine immunization systems for sustainability and equity. 

Using the Internet of Things to Manage Vaccines and Save Lives in Tanzania

The Internet of Things is already taking off in many different areas: in healthcare with drones delivering medical supplies to remote areas; energy management systems for buildings that will automatically adjust the window blinds based on the temperature; or traffic conditions that update your Google maps and give you real-time driving directions. In Tanzania, we are using it to manage vaccines so that children can receive safe vaccinations and lead healthy lives.

Reaching the Unreached: Expanding Access to HPV Vaccine in Madagascar

Last year, it was estimated that 1,804 of the 3,194 women in Madagascar who suffered from cervical cancer died. The HPV vaccine is not only a cost-effective method to prevent the economic burden of cervical cancers; it also protects against other types of cancers and symptoms of HPV, such as pelvic inflammatory disease.

Meeting the Immunization Needs of the Urban Poor

Rapid urbanization presents an urgent challenge for the world’s low- and middle-income countries. More than half of world’s population (3.9 billion) now lives in a city; by 2050, this number will skyrocket to 6.3 billion, with 90 percent of growth occurring in low- and middle-income countries. The first step to meeting the immunization needs of the urban poor is revealing the obstacles to vaccine access.

1,000 Years of Expertise Making Sure Vaccines Stay Effective

Last week, UNICEF hosted a meeting where experts with a combined 1,000 years of practice in cold chain maintenance discussed some of the current challenges and opportunities related to cold chain maintenance and temperature monitoring at the country level. This blog highlights some of the key themes that came out of the meeting.

The Deadly Sleeping Menace of Meningitis and What Can be Done

Ultimately, preparing for outbreaks begins long before the first case and must entail a strong routine immunization system that provides vaccinations to all target groups, regular communication and education of the public, regular upskilling of health workers, strong surveillance, prepositioning and stockpiling vaccines and appropriate medicines.

Beginning the Transition Process in Kenya: IMPACT Leaders Cluster Meetings

inSupply convened 30 county-level public health leaders from 10 counties and their national partners in Machakos, Kenya to launch the IMPACT Team Network approach for collaboratively solving supply chain problems through teamwork, data analysis, and continuous improvement.

Putting the Logic Back into the Logistics of the Immunization Supply Chain

Immunization supply chains managers should be thinking about how to use new technology and innovative ideas to deliver more product, faster, and at a lower cost. We aren’t looking for Amazon Prime and delivery in an hour (although that would be nice). What is needed, though, is a reliable and efficient supply chain system that guarantees that all children can be immunized.

How is your Memory? – Due Dates, Home-Based Records, and Vaccination

Sometimes, simpler solutions like paper cards are more efficient and usable than technology – particularly where they are needed most and where mobile services, electricity, the internet, and computers are not reliably available. Also, often the paper cards – when their value is emphasized and understood – can “live on” longer than the ever-changing and limited archival storage of electronic systems. A combination of both can be very effective.