Next Steps Necessary for Improving Nigeria’s Low Immunization Rates

It makes good sense to invest in routine immunizations. It gives one of the highest returns on investment—up to 44 dollars for every one dollar spent. In this blog post, Dr. Folake Olayinka outlines the steps that Nigeria can take to improve its low immunization rates and strengthen its routine immunization system.

Child Nutrition Beyond the 1,000-Day Window of Opportunity

This Universal Children’s Day, we encourage the global development community to think strategically, creatively, and inclusively in addressing nutrition before and after the 1,000-day window.

Managing Health Care Waste in the Push to 2020

Good health care waste management means increased health worker safety, better-quality patient care, reduced environmental degradation, lower costs, and opportunities for profit. States still struggle to establish systems for managing waste—but opportunities exist.

No Woman Should Give Birth Alone

It’s not cultural preferences that force women to give birth alone: poverty and lack of supportive health policies do. Nosa Orobaton, Bolaji Fapohunda and Anne Austin share insights from health policies – where one in five women give birth with no help.

End Malaria for Good: Improving access to mRDTs to reduce malaria-related mortality in Nigeria

World Malaria Day 2016 reminds us that robust financial investment, political will, and innovation are essential to ensure continued success in ending malaria for good. Prevention and treatment are equally important in the fight against malaria, and both depend on accurate and timely diagnosis. Nowhere is the need greater than in Nigeria, which has the highest mortality and morbidity due to malaria infections in the world. Malaria accounts for about 30% of all under-5 pediatric deaths each year and is the single biggest driver of demand for health services, accounting for 60% of all outpatient visits annually.

The Heart of the Matter

Did you know that more than one in ten women in Nigeria gives birth at home without a doctor, a skilled birth attendant, or even an unskilled relative? Bolaji Faphohuna and Nosa Orabaton, of the USAID|TSHIP project share findings from their extensive research into the factors that contribute to this maternal health crisis.

Simple solutions to global problems: How two medicines promise life for mothers and infants in Nigeria

  When each of my three children was born, a stream of nurses and doctors made sure that my wife and children would be safe. In many countries around the world, however, the situation is far different: the availability of medicines and skilled health workers are not assured. Therefore, there are no guarantees of a … Continue reading “Simple solutions to global problems: How two medicines promise life for mothers and infants in Nigeria”

Using GPS data to DELIVER health products to people faster

Imagine driving a delivery truck without a map or any idea how long it will take to get to your destination. The drivers delivering health commodities in Ebonyi State, Nigeria were dealing with this very problem. Existing digital data for the road network contained information on travel speeds for five percent of the roads, and only half of the roads were mapped at all.

Good News for Newborns and Mothers in Nigeria

What has happened for newborns in Nigeria in the past year? Are neonates in Nigeria faring any better or is it all talk and no action? Here are the facts.