The Case for Investing in Supply Chains to Support Malaria Programming

We need funding and investments in the supply chains that get nets to communities, diagnostics tools to practitioners, entomology supplies to researchers, insecticides and equipment to spray programs, and medicines to clients, wherever and whenever they are needed. Investments in supply chain strengthening contribute to greater product availability, preventing, diagnosing, and treating malaria, and ultimately in malaria case outcomes. Supply chain strengthening remains a critical component of the global malaria agenda.

Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness is Happening in Bondo, Western Kenya

Victoria notes that providing treatment in the community has also made caregivers more responsive to health education messages on improving household practices related to hygiene and sanitation, using long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets, and taking children with complications and non-iCCM conditions to the health centers.

Committed to Ending Malaria: A Look Back on the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT

On this World Malaria Day, April 25 2016, the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT joins with partners around the world in recognizing the achievements made in combating this deadly disease, as well as the critical need to sustain and increase our efforts in the coming years. With 214 million cases in the last year, it has never been more important to continue the fight against malaria.

End Malaria for Good: Improving access to mRDTs to reduce malaria-related mortality in Nigeria

World Malaria Day 2016 reminds us that robust financial investment, political will, and innovation are essential to ensure continued success in ending malaria for good. Prevention and treatment are equally important in the fight against malaria, and both depend on accurate and timely diagnosis. Nowhere is the need greater than in Nigeria, which has the highest mortality and morbidity due to malaria infections in the world. Malaria accounts for about 30% of all under-5 pediatric deaths each year and is the single biggest driver of demand for health services, accounting for 60% of all outpatient visits annually.

How on Earth Can a Remote Ethiopian Health Post Function without Electricity?

In remote regions of Ethiopia, JSI and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation are working to improve access to essential health services and commodities, including vaccines. Learn more in a new blog by Dr. Orin Levine, Director of Vaccine Delivery for the Gates Foundation.

The Ghana Urban Malaria Study helps us defend against a killer

JSI’s Edward Bonku, Health System Management Director to the Focus Region Health Project in Ghana, shares critical findings from a JSI-led study comparing malaria prevalence in urban versus rural settings.

Delivering Nets to those who Need them Most

Malaria continues to be one of the leading causes of child deaths around the world, despite the availability of low cost interventions to prevent those deaths. According to USAID, the disease causes an estimated 700,000 deaths annually, with nearly 90% of the illness and death caused by malaria occurring among children under five years of … Continue reading “Delivering Nets to those who Need them Most”