Mainstreaming Gender to Improve Nutrition Outcomes

Studies have not only shown that the majority of malnourished people are women and girls, but analyses of the distribution of nutrition-related tasks have also revealed the heavy workload of women and low involvement of men. This is why it is important to take gender relations into consideration in the fight against malnutrition.

Acknowledging the Barriers around Women’s Equality

In Guyana and Kenya, Advancing Partners & Communities (APC) is working to protect and advance women’s rights by decreasing instances of gender-based violence and female genital mutilation/cutting through the capacity building of local organizations.

Gender Integration Epiphanies – Insights From HIV Prevention Service Programs

JSI’s Naima Cozier and Tajan Renderos share insights from their work building the capacity of HIV service providers to integrate gender responsive programming.

The Shirt You Couldn’t Miss: Integrating HIV and GBV Prevention

This is a re-post of Daniel Cothran’s guest blog today (December 8, 2011) on The Global Health Magazine. Gender-based violence and a guide to assist with GBV and HIV prevention integration Ahh… ahh… Baby, I love you so much! …. We repeated this refrain, clapping the beat as the person in the middle of the … Continue reading “The Shirt You Couldn’t Miss: Integrating HIV and GBV Prevention”

World AIDS Day 2011: Looking at a Year of Change

World AIDS  Day.  It is that time of  year again when attention focuses on the response to HIV, looking back at progress made and looking forward to the opportunities and challenges ahead.  Much of the attention this year is positive, highlighting the unique opportunities before us.  The UNAIDS annual report puts forward the lofty, but … Continue reading “World AIDS Day 2011: Looking at a Year of Change”

Through Mutinta’s Eyes: The HIV epidemic in Zambia

But, I have also seen hope. I have seen people, organizations, countries coming together, putting resources together to help Zambians. I have seen a disease which was once a death sentence become a disease that can be managed, thanks to all the resources that have gone into providing testing facilities & ART, as well as care and support programs. I have seen the disease itself change from the virulent attacks characteristic of the early textbook description of AIDS, including severe oral thrush, severe Herpes Zoster, other skin manifestations; the AIDS we see now is milder, I think.