Using Digital Communication at World AIDS Day 2016

Since the first World AIDS Day in 1988, we have seen tremendous changes in our collective response to HIV and AIDS–including changes in the way advocates, leaders, people affected by the virus, and others communicate about HIV. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other digital platforms have made it possible for us to connect in creative ways and to reach diverse audiences with messages about this yearly observance.

Using Learning Collaboratives to Increase Access to Contraception to Achieve the Healthy People 2020 Goal for Contraceptive Use

JSI worked with twelve publicly-funded family planning sites to increase access to most and moderately effective methods of contraception at these sites. This was accomplished through an eight-month national learning collaborative that included monthly online learning sessions.

Lessons from the PEPFAR Gender-Based Violence Initiative

One in three women worldwide has been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused at least once in her lifetime. And women who have experienced gender-based violence (GBV) can face up to three times greater risk for HIV compared to those who have not, according to UNAIDS. GBV is common, affecting both women and men. Children and key populations are also at high risk, and often don’t have access to the resources they need.

Five Essential Readings Ahead of the Ministerial Conference on Immunization in Africa

Robert Steinglass, Director of JSI’s Immunization Center, provides essential reading in advance of the Ministerial Conference on Immunization in Africa.

Billing Third-Party Payers. Why Start Now?

Implementing or expanding third-party billing is a way for publicly-funded STD clinics to diversify revenue streams, ensure access to care, and potentially expand services to populations who need them the most. JSI’s Jennifer Kawatu and Andee Krasner offer tips and tools to help clinics navigate third-party billing.

Bright Light in HPV Vaccination Story: Traditionally Underserved Populations are Getting Attention

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that most boys aren’t receiving the HPV vaccine is not surprising, but there is some exciting news lurking in the study’s finding: The boys who are more likely to receive the HPV vaccine are the traditionally underserved – those who are minority, Hispanic, lower income, or in a single-mother household.