Using Digital Communication at World AIDS Day 2016

Since the first World AIDS Day in 1988, we have seen tremendous changes in our collective response to HIV and AIDS–including changes in the way advocates, leaders, people affected by the virus, and others communicate about HIV. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other digital platforms have made it possible for us to connect in creative ways and to reach diverse audiences with messages about this yearly observance.

December 1, 2016HIV/AIDS, International Health, U.S. Health

Domestic Violence: More than a Political Issue

The recent election sparked a national conversation about violence against women that had been ignored for too long. In the wake of the outcome, efforts to protect women’s health and prevent violence are critical. In the health field, we can capitalize on the increased public attention and opportunity in the healthcare landscape to address domestic violence as a critical public health issue.

November 22, 2016Health Issues, U.S. Health

Improving Health Data Quality in Mozambique

In 2013, JSI began assessing the quality of the data collected on six key indicators related to HIV by performing data quality assessments at health facilities in Mozambique. These assessments evaluate data collected at the facility level and compare recorded data to data captured at the national level in order to determine discrepancies and improve overall data quality.

The 2016 Soda Tax Battle

As public health advocates, we’ve got evidence on our side to support the positive impact of soda taxes: reduced consumption, increased awareness, and revenue raised. The evidence against sugary drinks continues to mount as the beverage industry’s disturbing tactics are revealed daily.

November 1, 2016Health Issues, U.S. Health

Why #APHA2016 is a Great Place for Social Media Conversations

APHA 2016, the American Public Health Association’s annual meeting, brings together over 12,000 people from the U.S. and around the world for conversations about public health initiatives. For the AIDS.gov team, those conversations also present an opportunity to highlight the ways in which digital tools can help our public health colleagues amplify their work and extend their reach, as well as, find new partners in the HIV response—especially for communities of color.

October 27, 2016HIV/AIDS, U.S. Health