Romania Case Study – Increasing Access to Reproductive Health Services and Supplies by Getting the Incentives Right

Like many Eastern European countries in the early 1990s, Romania had a history of low contraception use and a high rate of abortion. Starting in 1999, progress accelerated dramatically thanks to a number of critical and complementary interventions; a national health insurance scheme, the privatization of health providers, extensive policy change, training to enable more providers to offer family planning services, and a heavy focus on rural access.

To Achieve Universal Health Coverage, Get the Incentives Right

We need to look at whether people have the right mix of incentives to avoid unhealthy lifestyle choices, and to access preventive health, such as vaccinating their children, using contraceptives for birth spacing or to avoid pregnancy, using condoms for disease prevention, and sleeping under bed nets in malarial zones. But just as importantly, we need to ensure that health care providers, both individual and institutional, have the right alignment of incentives to deliver high quality, affordable health services and pharmaceuticals.

The Cola Challenge: What Makes Medicine Distribution Different?

Do we have anything to learn from the Cola supply chain? Certainly. Governments and others working to distribute health commodities can learn a lot from the private sector, which excels at finding innovative ways to reduce cost, improve efficiencies, plan effectively, create incentives, and motivate people.

Connecting with Businesses to Improve Health Service Delivery by Getting Life-Saving Health Products to People

Providing and maintaining continuous access to health products for the most difficult-to-reach populations necessitates the development of agile supply chains that rely on a multiplicity of partners and strategies to improve service delivery.

How to Use Data to Solve Social Problems and Drive Decisions: 4 Takeaways from Data for Good Exchange 2016

It’s been a couple hundred years since Dr. Snow plotted cholera deaths on a simple map; one of the earliest examples of data visualization and epidemiology. But using maps, geo-spatial data and geographic information system data is trendier than ever. Think: satellites, drones, smart phones. These powerful technologies offer billions of pixels worth of data that many industries have only just tapped into as a resource.

World Contraception Day: Recognizing 10 Years of Family Planning Excellence

Since 2006, the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, implemented by JSI, has worked in coordination with governments and international and local partners in over 72 countries to achieve universal access to family planning by strengthening health commodity supply chains and the policy environments that support them. In each country, we have had an impact. Over the life of the project, commodities shipped by the project have averted an estimated 79.4 million unwanted pregnancies, prevented more than 200,000 maternal deaths, and averted more than 1.2 million child deaths.

Digital LMIS Innovations: Linking the Information Silos: Tanzania’s HMIS – LMIS Data Exchange Yields Lessons for Broader Interoperability

We work with clients and countries around the globe to deploy innovative user-centered logistics management information systems (LMIS) and other tools that help people make better decisions and take effective action. We have learned a lot from these experiences, such as: What makes a system implementation successful? Once data is available, how can it be used to make decisions and improve performance? What other HIS solutions and processes are linked to these digital LMIS? We will be sharing stories and lessons learned specifically from Zambia, Tanzania and Ethiopia through our Digital LMIS Innovations Blog Series.

Inspired at Saving Lives at Birth DevX2016

I am passionate about the innovation that I represented at this forum, but it is very different to these innovations of “things”. Our proposal, partnering with Dimagi, is to replicate an approach JSI implemented and scaled with the Ministry of Health in Malawi and take those lessons to Kenya. While our approach does include innovative use of technology, a simple mHealth supply chain management tool for community health workers, this approach also includes IMPACT teams.

FP2020: Celebrating Our Progress by Fulfilling Our Promise

Since 2012, 24.4 million more women and girls are accessing modern contraception, bringing the total to 290.6 million users in the 69 FP2020 focus countries. Yet as we take time to celebrate these gains for women and girls, we know that there are still places in the world where a woman’s choice to use those contraceptives is not a given. As of 2015, 10 million fewer women and girls have been reached with lifesaving contraception than we had hoped by this time. Continuing at this pace means that millions of women and girls will not receive the family planning services and supplies they need to support their fundamental right to make decisions about their reproductive health. JSI’s Leslie Patykewich looks at the gains that have been made in ensuring women and girls have access to contraceptive information, services and supplies, and ways to address the barriers that are still faced.

Building a Community of Supply Chain Professionals

Around the world, immature immunization and health supply chains continue to inhibit availability of a variety of health commodities—including vaccines, nutrition products, reproductive health supplies, and general medicines—required to meet the health-related Sustainable Development Goals. Public health supply chain leader and manager capacity must be strengthened if this situation is to improve.