In Rwanda, an Abandoned Child Is Saved from Malnutrition and Dehydration

In countries like Rwanda, the Maternal and Child Survival Program is working to protect children from diseases and to improve their access to lifesaving treatments. This includes building capacity to plan, leverage resources, and scale up high-impact, cost-effective child health interventions. It also means extending child health services to hard-to-reach populations and those with limited access to services.

Strengthening Systems to Improve Nutrition Service Delivery in Northern Ghana

Through the five-year Resiliency in Northern Ghana project, USAID is testing a different approach to promoting sustainability by investing in local governments directly. This approach builds local governments’ capacity to develop action plans and related budgets, and to implement and closely monitor nutrition and livelihood outcomes, which creates a strong sense of community ownership and builds resilient local systems for effective programming.

These Micronutrients Have a Mighty Impact

A diverse, nutrient-rich diet is the most sustainable way to prevent the negative effects of micronutrient deficiencies, such as anemia and other conditions, which can permanently impede children’s physical and cognitive growth, increase maternal and infant morbidity, and in extreme cases, lead to mortality. To address these issues, Uganda’s Ministry of Health began working with USAID in 2016 on a project to make fortified foods and supplements available to communities that cannot receive these necessary nutrients from their local food sources.

Engaging and Supporting Mothers to Sustain Breastfeeding: Tsaganesh’s Story

Breastfeeding has many health benefits for both infants and mothers. It is critical during the first six months of life as it is a complete source of nutrition for babies and helps prevent diarrhea which is one of the major causes of death in infants. It also contributes to optimal cognitive development.

Who Needs to Do What? How We Use Data to Plan for Activating Families and Communities to Support Breastfeeding

Mothers are never alone in making choices about how to feed their children. Husbands, mothers-in-law, friends, village elders, doctors, employers, and even policymakers who surround mothers influence their nutrition practices. It makes sense that we need to engage these influencers as well as mothers to facilitate sustainable change.

Better Data, Better Results: 4 Lessons We’ve Learned about Mobile Data Collection

Mobile data collection is an exciting new tool that complements our approach to conducting surveys. Here are four lessons we learned about mobile data collection from our Resiliency in Northern Ghana project team and some tips to help in your own work.

Mainstreaming Gender to Improve Nutrition Outcomes

Studies have not only shown that the majority of malnourished people are women and girls, but analyses of the distribution of nutrition-related tasks have also revealed the heavy workload of women and low involvement of men. This is why it is important to take gender relations into consideration in the fight against malnutrition.

Child Nutrition Beyond the 1,000-Day Window of Opportunity

This Universal Children’s Day, we encourage the global development community to think strategically, creatively, and inclusively in addressing nutrition before and after the 1,000-day window.

Tracking Nutrition Funding Isn’t Easy, but the Payoff Could be Better Outcomes

Malnutrition is one of the greatest challenges to health and development in many low- and middle-income countries—it contributes to 45 percent of all deaths in children under the age of five. Like any national challenge, sufficient, sustained funding is needed to address this issue.