Engaging Private Sector Health Care Providers to Reach SDGs in India

In India, JSI has adopted a consultative, evidence-based, sequenced approach to developing a strategy for increasing private sector engagement in reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health services so as to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

Engaging and Supporting Mothers to Sustain Breastfeeding: Tsaganesh’s Story

Breastfeeding has many health benefits for both infants and mothers. It is critical during the first six months of life as it is a complete source of nutrition for babies and helps prevent diarrhea which is one of the major causes of death in infants. It also contributes to optimal cognitive development.

Who Needs to Do What? How We Use Data to Plan for Activating Families and Communities to Support Breastfeeding

Mothers are never alone in making choices about how to feed their children. Husbands, mothers-in-law, friends, village elders, doctors, employers, and even policymakers who surround mothers influence their nutrition practices. It makes sense that we need to engage these influencers as well as mothers to facilitate sustainable change.

Better Data, Better Results: 4 Lessons We’ve Learned about Mobile Data Collection

Mobile data collection is an exciting new tool that complements our approach to conducting surveys. Here are four lessons we learned about mobile data collection from our Resiliency in Northern Ghana project team and some tips to help in your own work.

Should JSI Promote the Use of Tranexamic Acid for the Treatment of Postpartum Hemorrhage?

In 2015, more than 300,000 women died in childbirth. The vast majority of these deaths could have been prevented. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal death and accounts for an estimated 19 percent of maternal deaths. Who will hemorrhage after delivery is unpredictable but if untreated, PPH can kill a woman within 2 hours.

Can Social Networks Alter Community Social Norms to Improve Maternal Health?

The objective of the Community Benefits Health pilot in Ghana was to influence women’s social networks and generate community-level support, leading to improved knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and maternal health behaviors. It was determined that using social network analysis to strengthen interventions focused on shifting social norms significantly improved uptake of maternal health and pregnancy behaviors.

From “Non” to “Oui”: How Community Health Workers are Revolutionizing Contraceptive Access, Use in Benin

Community health workers can meet women in their homes to provide accurate information, counseling, and contraceptives. This intimate service provision allows women and men to decide for themselves, perhaps for the first time, the number, timing, and spacing of their children.

Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI) Training for MCSP Facilities and the Importance of Job Aids in Institutionalizing IMNCI

In 2013, Liberia launched a shortened 6‐day IMNCI training curriculum. The Maternal and Child Survival Program organized one of the first large‐scale training activities using this new training curriculum. Participants felt that the IMNCI training was one of the most relevant and useful skills building, in-service training activities that they have had the opportunity to participate in during their clinical careers. It closed the gaps in the quality of care for assessing and managing sick young infant and children under five years of age.

Timor-Leste Recognized as Most Improved Nation in Health SDGs

Learn what steps Timor-Leste and its partners took to be rated as the most improved of 188 nations in the health-related Sustainable Development Goals index for the period 2000-2015.

Journey to Scale: Five Things We Learned from Implementing the Chlorhexidine Cord Care Program in Nepal

The Nepal experience has generated many lessons that JSI, in partnership with the Nepalese government, have used to provide guidance and technical assistance to governments around the world that are interested in the use of chlorhexidine.