Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI) Training for MCSP Facilities and the Importance of Job Aids in Institutionalizing IMNCI

In 2013, Liberia launched a shortened 6‐day IMNCI training curriculum. The Maternal and Child Survival Program organized one of the first large‐scale training activities using this new training curriculum. Participants felt that the IMNCI training was one of the most relevant and useful skills building, in-service training activities that they have had the opportunity to participate in during their clinical careers. It closed the gaps in the quality of care for assessing and managing sick young infant and children under five years of age.

Timor-Leste Recognized as Most Improved Nation in Health SDGs

Learn what steps Timor-Leste and its partners took to be rated as the most improved of 188 nations in the health-related Sustainable Development Goals index for the period 2000-2015.

Journey to Scale: Five Things We Learned from Implementing the Chlorhexidine Cord Care Program in Nepal

The Nepal experience has generated many lessons that JSI, in partnership with the Nepalese government, have used to provide guidance and technical assistance to governments around the world that are interested in the use of chlorhexidine.

Romania Case Study – Increasing Access to Reproductive Health Services and Supplies by Getting the Incentives Right

Like many Eastern European countries in the early 1990s, Romania had a history of low contraception use and a high rate of abortion. Starting in 1999, progress accelerated dramatically thanks to a number of critical and complementary interventions; a national health insurance scheme, the privatization of health providers, extensive policy change, training to enable more providers to offer family planning services, and a heavy focus on rural access.

World Contraception Day: Recognizing 10 Years of Family Planning Excellence

Since 2006, the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, implemented by JSI, has worked in coordination with governments and international and local partners in over 72 countries to achieve universal access to family planning by strengthening health commodity supply chains and the policy environments that support them. In each country, we have had an impact. Over the life of the project, commodities shipped by the project have averted an estimated 79.4 million unwanted pregnancies, prevented more than 200,000 maternal deaths, and averted more than 1.2 million child deaths.

Community-based Provision of Contraceptive Injectables: Home and Self Injection Study in Malawi

As we commemorate World Contraception Day 2016, we must note that approximately 225 million women worldwide still lack access to a modern method of contraception. Increasing access to family planning was a premier goal of the Millennium Development Goals, and if we are to achieve the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals and the FP2020 goal of reaching 120 million new users of contraception in the world’s poorest 69 countries, we must provide people with readily available contraception.

Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness is Happening in Bondo, Western Kenya

Victoria notes that providing treatment in the community has also made caregivers more responsive to health education messages on improving household practices related to hygiene and sanitation, using long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets, and taking children with complications and non-iCCM conditions to the health centers.

Nepal’s Female Community Health Volunteers Help a Fractured System Rebound

Female Community Health Volunteers in Nepal have a long history of doing an excellent job promoting essential health services in communities cut off from facilities. Because of this history, the role of FCHVs was more crucial than ever after the earthquake devastated the country’s health infrastructure.

Nourishing Children Where Food is not Enough

Meeting the nutritional needs of young children is a particularly important aspect of global health, as insufficient nutrition during periods of rapid growth, which overlap with the weaning period, can have serious negative effects on health and other life-long outcomes. The long-term solution for solving micronutrient inadequacy is ensuring a sustainable and diverse diet through food-based approaches.