Should JSI Promote the Use of Tranexamic Acid for the Treatment of Postpartum Hemorrhage?

In 2015, more than 300,000 women died in childbirth. The vast majority of these deaths could have been prevented. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal death and accounts for an estimated 19 percent of maternal deaths. Who will hemorrhage after delivery is unpredictable but if untreated, PPH can kill a woman within 2 hours.

Highlighting the Health of Palestine Refugees in Jordan

More and more evidence is being produced to show that the lived experience of Palestine refugees is not monolithic, but rather quite varied based on when they became refugees, and where they landed as refugees. More evidence is still needed, no one would argue otherwise, but isn’t it also time for more action as well? We need to translate new and existing evidence to strategically hold governments and the global community accountable for ensuring equitable evidence-based policy and practices for all Palestine refugees.

Tobacco Control – The First Community Mobilization Movement

The tobacco control movement in the U.S. was one of the very first community “resistance” movements. It involved mobilizing against corporate greed, and a willingness to subvert public good to private will. So much was achieved in a relatively short time, but much remains to be done. On World No Tobacco Day 2017, let us celebrate how much has been achieved by people collectively speaking on behalf of their own health and welfare.

Evaluating the Influence of Human-Centered Design on Health Programs

As the human-centered design (HCD) field develops, it is critical that we also include measurement in the conversation. Pinning down the influence of HCD through measurement can help us to better understand the link between HCD and program impact. With such insight, we can inform and improve the practice, while unpacking how design can enhance public health work.

1,000 Years of Expertise Making Sure Vaccines Stay Effective

Last week, UNICEF hosted a meeting where experts with a combined 1,000 years of practice in cold chain maintenance discussed some of the current challenges and opportunities related to cold chain maintenance and temperature monitoring at the country level. This blog highlights some of the key themes that came out of the meeting.

What Do the People Do, When Computers Do All the Work?

No matter how complex the computer modeling, no matter how well-automated the processes, no matter how ingenious the machine learning, a computer can’t predict when a medicine’s dispensing protocol changes, or anticipate how quickly or completely new product or regimen uptake will occur. What we have learned over the years, beyond the importance of data visibility and analysis, is that human practice controls medicine dispensing and ultimately demand. Computers can’t, in actuality, do all the work.

Post-Ebola: What about the Survivors?

Ebola survivors have an abundance of medical and psychological problems: musculoskeletal conditions that cause joint stiffness; ocular conditions that can lead to cataracts and blindness; anxiety disorders, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder—to name a few—all of which require specialized medical care. More resources need to be directed to helping survivors get appropriate health care and mental health services.

The Deadly Sleeping Menace of Meningitis and What Can be Done

Ultimately, preparing for outbreaks begins long before the first case and must entail a strong routine immunization system that provides vaccinations to all target groups, regular communication and education of the public, regular upskilling of health workers, strong surveillance, prepositioning and stockpiling vaccines and appropriate medicines.

Beginning the Transition Process in Kenya: IMPACT Leaders Cluster Meetings

inSupply convened 30 county-level public health leaders from 10 counties and their national partners in Machakos, Kenya to launch the IMPACT Team Network approach for collaboratively solving supply chain problems through teamwork, data analysis, and continuous improvement.

Putting the Logic Back into the Logistics of the Immunization Supply Chain

Immunization supply chains managers should be thinking about how to use new technology and innovative ideas to deliver more product, faster, and at a lower cost. We aren’t looking for Amazon Prime and delivery in an hour (although that would be nice). What is needed, though, is a reliable and efficient supply chain system that guarantees that all children can be immunized.