Insights from the United States Conference on AIDS

Several sessions this year focused on what works in HIV prevention for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth of color. One approach to engaging these disproportionately affected youth is to use community mobilization, or outreach to, and collaboration with, different community stakeholders.

Early-Infant Diagnosis: Bringing Infants into the HIV Equation

Early infant diagnosis (EID) is a complex cascade whose every step must be completed successfully. Complexity begins at the facility itself. EID is not yet a routine service; exposed infants tend to be identified either when they come for other services or when mothers bring them for testing.

Derek Kunaka: On Strengthening Health Systems to Meet SDGs

We have a learning model at MEval-SIFSA where we’ve itemised what defines a health system as “functioning.” For us, a strong, functioning system is one that takes you through the entire data management process and evaluates how the data is gathered, interpreted and analysed. But most importantly, a functioning system uses data to maximise a health programme’s impact and improve health outcomes.

Live from Facebook, It’s AIDS.gov! Lessons We’ve Learned so Far

Over the years, we’ve learned a lot about managing production and handling the challenges of coordinating filming, editing, and posting videos across distances and time zones. But we always enjoy a new challenge, so we were excited when Facebook announced the public release of Facebook Live last Spring, which records videos and posts them to the site in real time. Needless to say, we’ve learned a lot from our first 20 Facebook Live videos. Here are the 6 P’s of what we’ve learned so far.

Managing Health Care Waste in the Push to 2020

Good health care waste management means increased health worker safety, better-quality patient care, reduced environmental degradation, lower costs, and opportunities for profit. States still struggle to establish systems for managing waste—but opportunities exist.

Youth to Durban: “Listen!”

Last week in Durban, at the International Conference on AIDS, young people stole the show. This was the second Durban conference; the first was 16 years ago, in 2000. Back then, a major conference topic was commitment: mobilizing leaders around the world to commit seriously to addressing the spread of HIV in their countries. Looking back on our progress since 2000, the HIV and AIDS community can say with pride that we have come a long way. Seventeen million people have access to treatment. We have eliminated mother-to-child transmission in Cuba, Belarus, Armenia, Moldova and Thailand.