Voices of Public Health – Addressing the HIV Epidemic in Zambia: Dr. Muka Chikuba-McLeod

In this episode, you’ll hear from Dr. Muka Chikuba-McLeod who has been at the frontlines of the fight against HIV since the beginning of the epidemic in the country. She is the director of the USAID DISCOVER-Health project and JSI’s country representative for Zambia. Dr. Chikuba-McLeod talks to JSI’s Director of Communications, Penelope Riseborough about HIV prevention, treatment, and care; game changers in HIV; and what it will take to achieve epidemic control.

The Contraceptive Revolution in Benin

Three years ago, when Benin hovered near the bottom of the world statistics on contraceptive prevalence, and all we heard from naysayers was how “impossible and culturally sensitive” family planning is in the country, I might not have bet very much on this [the introduction of Sayana Press] being a success. But it has been so far, and all signs show it promises to go further, even faster.

Launching a Revolution: Sayana Press Introduction in Benin

On September 26, World Contraception Day 2017, the Beninese Ministry of Health will formally launch Sayana Press—a small, easy-to-use, prefilled, three-month injectable contraceptive that is expanding the contraceptive method mix. Given the enthusiastic response from clients, service providers, and policymakers, Sayana Press has the potential to revolutionize contraceptive use in Benin.

No More Empty Stocks: Contraceptives Reach Rural Women Thanks to Pioneering Logistics System

Having the logistics system in place means that women from remote areas can rely on public health centers to provide a steady supply of contraceptives and reproductive health medicines.

5 Ways Family Planning Promotes Prosperity and Saves Lives

Family planning is one of the most life-saving, empowering, and cost-effective interventions for women and girls. When women have access to family planning services and reproductive health commodities, they are more likely to go further in their education, survive childbirth, and raise healthier children. Giving women the tools to plan their families can transform economies.

From “Non” to “Oui”: How Community Health Workers are Revolutionizing Contraceptive Access, Use in Benin

Community health workers can meet women in their homes to provide accurate information, counseling, and contraceptives. This intimate service provision allows women and men to decide for themselves, perhaps for the first time, the number, timing, and spacing of their children.

Using Learning Collaboratives to Increase Access to Contraception to Achieve the Healthy People 2020 Goal for Contraceptive Use

JSI worked with twelve publicly-funded family planning sites to increase access to most and moderately effective methods of contraception at these sites. This was accomplished through an eight-month national learning collaborative that included monthly online learning sessions.

World Contraception Day: Recognizing 10 Years of Family Planning Excellence

Since 2006, the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, implemented by JSI, has worked in coordination with governments and international and local partners in over 72 countries to achieve universal access to family planning by strengthening health commodity supply chains and the policy environments that support them. In each country, we have had an impact. Over the life of the project, commodities shipped by the project have averted an estimated 79.4 million unwanted pregnancies, prevented more than 200,000 maternal deaths, and averted more than 1.2 million child deaths.

Community-based Provision of Contraceptive Injectables: Home and Self Injection Study in Malawi

As we commemorate World Contraception Day 2016, we must note that approximately 225 million women worldwide still lack access to a modern method of contraception. Increasing access to family planning was a premier goal of the Millennium Development Goals, and if we are to achieve the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals and the FP2020 goal of reaching 120 million new users of contraception in the world’s poorest 69 countries, we must provide people with readily available contraception.